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Johannesburg Pride is in its 29th year and the current Johannesburg Pride team has been actively working on growing the Johannesburg Pride platform since the 24th annual event in 2013. We manage this event via an entity registered in the name of Johannesburg Pride NPC. The current team comprises completely of non-remunerated volunteers with identification across the spectrum of straight, gender reassigned, lesbian and gay males.JoburgPride

Due to the number of disappointments experienced at the hands of volunteers, the policy now requires anyone who wishes to volunteer to submit a detailed CV outlining capabilities to ensure the correct synergy is established. All CV’s are reviewed by an independent team who then execute the on-boarding process of any successful volunteers.
The team at Johannesburg Pride has worked hard to make pride an all-inclusive platform catering for the LGBTQ+ME community. The results have been amazing, as we truly became the Pride of Africa. It has taken 5 years to rebuild the Johannesburg Pride platform, attendance, support and diversity and to date, in spite of the troughs, the journey has been amazing. To help build support, we attempted to hold public meetings, but in most cases the Pride team ended up disappointed due to public no show.
Johannesburg Pride has no true source of income and remains an unfunded NPC. We have been fortunate to draw the attention of a few supporters within the corporate sector who help us pay the bills but to date the directors have always chipped in to ensure all Johannesburg Pride’s bills are paid before the event. On our path to ensuring Johannesburg Pride self- sustainability, we sell the pouring rights, market space and VIP Tickets.
In 2018 we at Johannesburg Pride have made a bold move to host a 4 day event where we will engage in smaller pre- and post-Pride activities. Some of these activities are being sponsored and some have direct costs associated with them and will require tickets to be purchased to ensure the relevant costs are managed. We are thankful and humbled for the way the community comes out to support us. To further develop the LGBTQ+ME community of Johannesburg we are in the process of engaging with sponsors for a much needed Johannesburg Pride Safe House. This initiative has been slow to start but we will continue to persevere until we are able to provide a decent calibre Safe House for the Gauteng Community and beyond.
We are looking forward to seeing you all at Johannesburg Pride running from the 25 - 28 October 2018. Please refer to our website and social media platforms for more details on the 4 days which encompass a total of 6 events.

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Antarctica has chilled through the icy continent’s first LGBTI+ Pride celebration.
Approximately 1300km from the South Pole, The United States’ McMurdo Station commemorated their home nation’s Pride month in June.
Shawn Waldron, Evan Townsend and eight others from the station starting preparing for the icy Pride in April, ahead of the continent’s extended period of darkness.AntarcticPride
“Why not take this photo and let people see that there’s queer representation – even at the end of the Earth,” Waldron said.
The station is home to almost 900 people during the summer, with a small LGBTI+ network who come together for events and viewings of RuPaul’s Drag Race.
“We had a few LGBTQ social events that people showed up to and also because it’s such a small community, it’s easy to find out who is and who isn’t in the community,” Townsend added, “My biggest fear before I left was, I’m going to be the only gay person, there’s going to be no one else here. I was wrong.”
“Having an example of somebody who travels and can have those adventures would’ve been a great thing for me as a kid but even more so being able to see that there are queer people out there who are proud of their queerness and that in no way inhibits them from living these adventures.”

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In Afghanistan, as part of an illegal but traditional practice, men recruit young boys, luring them with gifts and money with the intention of having sex with them. They do it under the guise of a disgusting old sexual traditional practice called “bacha bazi” (boy play).Afgh2
The practice has been widely discussed — for example, in The New York Times, Newsweek and The Daily Mail. Further coverage comes in a video documentary titled ‘They don’t just dance’ that is now available online through RTDoc – an English-language documentary channel created by Russia’s government-backed media company RT.
The documentary shows how under-aged boys are recruited and taught how to dance like women in parties organized by rich folks, who then later select their favorite boy for sex.
In Afghanistan, this is not viewed as homosexuality, even though there are strict laws prohibiting the act.

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Human Rights Campaigner Was Protesting Legally

LGBT+ and human rights campaigner Peter Tatchell has been arrested during a one-man protest against Russia's mistreatment of LGBT+ people, as the 2018 FIFA World Cup kicks off in Moscow.

Mr Tatchell was holding a banner supporting gay men who have been violently targeted in a purge in Chechnya while standing next to the statue Marshal Zhukov close to the Kremlin.tATCHELLrUSSIA

This is the campaigner’s sixth visit to Russia in solidarity with the LGBT+ freedom struggle there. He was previously arrested twice during protests in Moscow and suffered brain damage after being attacked by Russian neo-Nazis in 2007.

Peter Tatchell, speaking from Moscow before the protest, said:

“I was exercising my lawful right to protest, under the Russian constitution, which guarantees freedom of expression and the right to protest in Articles 29 and 31. A one-person protest, which is what I did, requires no permission from the authorities and the police.

“Getting arrested is standard for Russians who protest for LGBT+ rights or against corruption, economic injustice and Russia’s annexation of Crimea and its bombing of civilians in Syria.

“Unlike brave Russian protesters, I have the ‘protection’ of a British passport, which means I have been treated more leniently than they are.

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By Lawrence Mashiyane

 

It is February and, for those who care for such things as Valentine's Day, it is the month of Love. Some scurried throughout January to get someone 'special' and others are getting on the love train before the 14th. At the end of search, many will be on dates on the 14th and many will be having sex; others will probably be watching TV, but we are not interested in them for now (and clearly love isn't either). The interest is in the ones who will be on dates and/or having a shag. The interest is in what happens after Valentine's Day.Happilyeverafter After Valentine's Day, how long until the romance fizzles out and turns into a memory or worse, a one night stand? You're probably thinking not long and if you are then it means you know about the cloud that hovers over the gay community; our relationships do not last. Of course this stereotype or stigma does not apply to everyone in the gay community but, as I always say, stereotypes do not come from out of nowhere. They are not made up. Stereotypes are that big cloud of black smoke that let every one know there's a fire. It does not mean an entire building is burning, but it does mean a floor or two could be.

For any relationship to last, one thing is important and that one thing comes before love, trust and commitment/faithfulness. That one thing is compatibility. The problem with the gay community is that compatibility has been cut down to two simple things; sex role and behaviour/gender expression. "Are you top, bottom or versatile?" They ask. "Are you 'straight' acting or feminine?" Once those two questions are asked and the answers are the desired, everything is good to go! But truth is, it is not good to go. Not at all! I am not saying that those things are not important (although how greatly important is up for debate), I am saying that there is more to find out beyond those two. There is a lack of compatibility in Gay relationships and it is usually because people have two things in mind: Society and Sex.

Whether a guy is effeminate or not is usually a concern with society; especially if one is in the closet. Sometimes it is preference but also, some people prefer to be with more masculine or 'straight acting' guys because it is a lot less obvious and covert. When two guys walk down the street, looking all heterosexual, no one really thinks "oh look, there goes a gay couple" but the concern is if a guy walks with another guy who has a twist in his hips, a twang in his voice and speaks with swinging hands; it all looks too obvious. The feminine guy draws too much attention, the two guys walking together now stick out like a sore thumb. Even if some guys are 'open' and out of the closet, the still remain (if I can say) conservative. They do not want to put society on edge, draw the attention of homophobes and they believe that their sexuality is no body's business. A fear for being judged for being gay still exists.

The second concern is Sex. The "are you top, bottom or versatile question?" simply put is, "are we going to be able to fuck or not?" I reject any other interpretation, it simply amounts to that.

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